Japanese Knotweed in a Neighbours Garden?

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Japanese Knotweed is the most vicious and fastest spreading of the perennial plant species. Taking the UK by storm, its ferocious nature makes it a nightmare for homeowners and those looking to purchase property or land.

Over recent years the information and general awareness of Japanese Knotweed has increased drastically, meaning that it’s now easier than ever to identify the invasive plant in your garden, given a good eye and some attentiveness.

What does the law state?

UK law classifies Japanese knotweed as a controlled plant under the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, Section 114. It is not illegal to have Japanese knotweed on your property, but it is against law to allow the plant to spread.

Homeowners failing to control Japanese knotweed on their property can be prosecuted and fined as much as £2,500 under new legislation. A number of factors have contributed to this decline. These factors include new laws and legal regulations, such as those concerning anti-social behaviour, as well as the growing presence of invasive species such as Knotweed.

Who’s responsible for removing it?

If your neighbour has Japanese knotweed on their property, they are not obliged to remove it from their own property. However, if it spreads out onto your property, you can seek legal action to remove it professionally and claim financial compensation where necessary.

The best approach to dealing with Japanese knotweed is to identify and treat it as soon as possible. This not only speeds up the resolution process but is more cost effective. Homeowners who have Japanese knotweed growing on their property may not be aware of the trouble it can cause because they have not identified it. If you suspect that your neighbour’s property contains Japanese knotweed, notify them immediately.

You should notify the neighbour of the suspected issue before taking legal action. They may not have otherwise been aware.

How do I remove Japanese Knotweed?

Identifying Japanese Knotweed as early as possible is the best chance you have of a hassle-free removal of the plant. Due to its rapid growth rate and huge underground routing systems growth potential, once the invasion starts, it’s best to seek professional help immediately.

Depending on the size of the initial infestation and the time in which it’s been spreading for will determine the process of removal. With only a handful of legal methods of removing Japanese Knotweed, most of which requiring a permit or license for removal, it’s no surprise this can’t be dealt with your ordinary weed killer.

These processes can require multiple rounds of treatment spread out over multiple weeks, or even months. For much larger infestations commonly found on derelict land treatments can take several years to complete. This should give you some idea on just how difficult it is to take on this invasive perennial species.

Find out more about our Japanese Knotweed removal services.

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